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the whitlam government book - 328 items found | Last update: 29 January 2023 - 03:47:22

Vietnam: The Australian War

For the first time this is the full story of Australia's involvement in our longest military campaign 'Surely God weeps,' an Australian soldier wrote in despair of the conflict in Vietnam. But no God intervened to shorten the years of carnage and devastation in this most controversial of wars. the ten-year struggle in the rice paddies and jungles of South Vietnam unleashed the most devastating firepower on the Vietnamese nation, visiting terrible harm on both civilians and soldiers.Yet the Australian experience was very different from that of the Americans. Guided by their commanders' knowledge of jungle combat, Australian troops operated with stealth, deception and restraint to pursue a 'better war'. In reconstructing for the first time the full history of our longest military campaign, Paul Ham draws on hundreds of accounts by soldiers, politicians, aid workers, entertainers and the Vietnamese people. From the commitment to engage, through the fight over conscription and the rise of the anti-war movement, to the tactics and horror of the battlefield, Ham exhumes the truth about this politicians' war - which sealed the fate of 50,000 Australian servicemen and women. More than 500 Australian soldiers were killed and thousands wounded. those who made it home returned to a hostile ...

Tribal Cultural Resource Management: The Full Circle to Stewardship (Heritage Resource Management Series Book 4)

The entrance of Native Americans into the world of cultural resource management is forcing a change in the traditional paradigms that have guided archaeologists, anthropologists, and other CRM professionals. This book examines these developments from tribal perspectives, and articulates native views on the identification of cultural resources, how they should be handled and by whom, and what their meaning is in contemporary life. Sponsored by the Heritage Resources Management Program, University of Nevada, Reno

Power Without Responsibility? Ministerial Staffers in Australian Governments fro

A raft of recent political scandals in Australia has generated widespread media and public interest in the role and accountability of ministerial staffers, and their impact on relations between ministers and their public service advisers. Such scandals include the notorious ‘Children Overboard’ affair and the more recent AWB imbroglio. In Power Without Responsibility Anne Tiernan describes the contemporary working environment of political staffers, their formal and less formal roles, the challenges they face, and the forces that have escalated the growth in their numbers and influence.

Whitlam

Edward Gough Whitlam was one of the most momentous figures in Australian political history. Born into a privileged life that should have seen him on the side with the 'born-to-rule gang,' Whitlam took a different path and joined the Australian Labor Party. Although he was branded as a 'silver tail' (one who is considered wealthy, usually by inherited money) by the rough and ready men of Labor, Whitlam fought to convince Labor that they were something more than just the political arm of the union movement, and that principle without power was an exercise in futility. He overcame party resistance and, in 1972, led Labor triumphantly into the government benches, where he became Parliamentary leader. However, the pace of change scared too many people and sudden developments in the world economic environment brought challenges Whitlam could not overcome. Nor could he overcome the local political challenges thrown down by the conservative forces, once they had recovered from the shock of the 1972 election results. Whitlam held them at bay when they forced him to the electors 18 months ahead of schedule in mid-1974. Although he won the election with a reduced majority, he and his colleagues seemed determined to continue providing the opposition with the ammunition needed to shoot him do...

Australia's Constitution after Whitlam (Cambridge Studies in Constitutional Law Book 17)

Australia's constitutional crisis of 1975 was not simply about the precise powers of the Senate or the Governor-General. It was about competing accounts of how to legitimate informal constitutional change. For Prime Minister Gough Whitlam, and the parliamentary tradition that he invoked, national elections sufficiently legitimated even the most constitutionally transformative of his goals. For his opponents, and a more complex tradition of popular sovereignty, more decisive evidence was required of the consent of the people themselves. This book traces the emergence of this fundamental constitutional debate and chronicles its subsequent iterations in sometimes surprising institutional configurations: the politics of judicial appointment in the Murphy Affair; the evolution of judicial review in the Mason Court; and the difficulties Australian republicanism faced in the Howard Referendum. Though the patterns of institutional engagement have changed, the persistent question of how to legitimate informal constitutional change continues to shape Australia's constitution after Whitlam.

The Great Crash: The Short Life and Sudden Death of the Whitlam Government

The dismissal of the Whitlam government on November 11, 1975, was arguably the most dramatic event in Australian political history. To mark its 30th anniversary, this account by a then-insider who is also an authority on Australian constitutional history revisits the major themes of 1975 and describes how various interest groups set out to derail the reform agenda of the first Labor government in 23 years. Written with clarity and extraordinary insight, this study of power is also a fascinating political story that offers lessons about what may lie ahead for future opposition movements in Australia.

The Menzies Era

An assessment of Australia's longest-serving Prime Minister, Sir Robert Menzies, by John Howard, Australia's second-longest serving Prime Minister, this is a significant, unique and fascinating history of the Menzies era - a time that laid the foundations for modern Australia. 'Engaging and revealing ... like a torchlight shone from an unexpected angle' Geoffrey Blainey, Weekend AustralianFresh from the success of his phenomenal bestselling memoir, LAZARUS RISING, which has sold over 100,000 copies, John Howard now turns his attention to one of the most extraordinary periods in Australian history, the Menzies era, canvassing the longest unbroken period of government for one side of politics in Australia's history. The monumental Sir Robert Menzies held power for a total of over 18 years, making him the longest-serving Australian Prime Minister. During his second term as Prime Minister, a term of over sixteen years - by far the longest unbroken tenure in that office - Menzies dominated Australian politics like no one else has ever done before or since, and these years laid the foundations for modern Australia. The Menzies era saw huge economic growth, social change and considerable political turmoil. Covering the impact of the great Labor split of 1955 as well as the recovery of t...

Keeping Your Friends Close - Did Western Intelligence Meddling help to topple an Australian Government?

On November 11 1975, the Australian Labor Government of Prime Minister Gough Whitlam was removed from office by the Governor-General Sir John Kerr. It has long been rumoured that Kerr's intervention was precipitated by concerns emanating from western intelligence and that the Governor-General acted on these concerns in order to preserve Australia's place within the Western Alliance.

Making Modern Australia: The Whitlam Government's 21st Century Agenda (Australian History)

The changes we have made will remain-like all great Labor legislation-permanent landmarks in our history.--Gough Whitlam ***The Whitlam government propelled Australia out of the presumptions and certainties of twenty-three years of conservative government, changing it irrevocably. It passed a record number of bills into law and became the most successful reformist government in Australia's history. This book brings to light aspects of Whitlam's ambitious reform agenda that have been neglected for too long. The Australian Assistance Plan generated networks of regional and community cooperation that remain today. Plans for energy infrastructure and self-sufficiency that would ensure the use of the nation's resources for the common good appear more and more visionary. The ground-breaking Royal Commission into Human Relationships is clearly a forerunner of the current royal commissions into institutionalised child abuse and family violence. New research shows the extent to which this reforming agenda continued the post-war reconstruction plans of Curtin and Chifley. The personal dimension of this agenda-how Whitlam's approach to policy design and implementation was influenced by his childhood in Canberra-is also detailed. Finally, the book reassesses the place of the Whitlam governme...

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